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Bubble, Bubble…Toilet Trouble

 by Evan PriceLabOnToilet_cropped

Now that Halloween has been placed squarely in the rear view mirror, we all start to look forward to the next major holiday. Thoughts of sugar-filled sweets are replaced by thoughts of turkey, cranberry sauce, and stuffing. This also happens to be the time when we most often see pets with digestive issues (vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, and flatulence). Knowing what to do when your dog is vomiting or has diarrhea is important. Knowing how to prevent these conditions before they start is key.

It is normal for a pet to feel under the weather from time to time, in the same way that we sometimes feel a little bit sick. Once in a while, this will even be accompanied by diarrhea or vomiting.

Vomiting usually occurs under one of three conditions:

  1. A dog has eaten too much food.
  2. A dog has eaten food too quickly.
  3. A dog has been introduced to a food (or combination of foods) that caused digestive disruption.

I emphasize the combination of foods for a reason. Even if the majority of the diet is raw meat, if a highly cooked, or otherwise processed item is given, there is a high chance of digestive upset. This means that the little piece of cooked turkey that you gave your dog as a treat actually may have done more harm than good. This is the same philosophy we share with split feeders, but it applies to the holiday season as well.

Raw foods are in and out of the system quickly (4-6 hours from mouth to tail). Foods that have been cooked are harder for the body to break down and take double the time to digest (about 8-12 hours). When there is such a difference in digestive time, the pancreas gets confused and does not know what kinds of digestive enzymes to produce. The result can be…messy.

Despite this warning, there are those that will continue to feed table scraps during family get togethers. Maybe their dogs have never gotten sick before from a little human food as a treat, and ultimately, it is their choice. But as we know, age humbles us all, and the ability to handle these types of indulgences decreases over time. If you plan on indulging your pet, be prepared if trouble should arise.

Make sure to have these items on hand this holiday season:

  • Nux Vom is a great cure for RTS (rumbling tummy syndrome). This powerful, yet harmless homeopathic remedy stops nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea in their tracks.
  • Luxolite clay helps to extract toxins from the body, and supports digestion, circulation, and proper liver and kidney function.

And of course, no conversation of digestive aides is complete without mentioning E-BARF Plus. This veterinarian formulated probiotic helps to support a healthy immune system and provides vital enzymes for improved digestion.

Until next time, happy BARFing

Evan Price is a Raw Pet Food Specialist for BARF World Inc. He is a true dog lover at heart with a particular interest in Daschunds. Evan is also an avid sports enthusiast and bridge player. For more articles like these and to learn more about the benefits of raw food for your pets, sign up for The Intelligent Pet weekly e-zine at The Intelligent Pet.

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Dental Health Tips For Puppies

By Monica Reyes

bwpuppyAs a new puppy owner, you know that training, proper feeding, love, and attention are all on the top of your daily to-do list. Having a new pup is exciting and will keep you busy, so it’s easy to forget good dental habits for your puppy. This article will provide a good insight as to why oral health is important, as well as tips on how to make dental health for your puppy a bit easier for the hectic puppy household!

The health of our dogs is very important throughout the many stages of their lives. As a pet parent, we monitor and maintain the health and lifestyles of our furry loved ones, and do everything we can to provide the very best for them.

When thinking about your puppy’s dental health, it may not seem like much of a priority; after all, her teeth are brand new and strong. (If you’ve ever had a dog tear through a pair of your favorite shoes, you know exactly what I mean!) But yes, it is essential to keep up with your pup’s dental health making good dental hygiene second-nature for her at an early age.

We all know that our pups eventually lose their baby teeth, but it is still very important that we maintain good dental health early on to ensure dental diseases are prevented. After your dog eats, food gathers where the gums and teeth meet. This forms plaque and tartar which can eventually lead to gingivitis. In severe cases, gingivitis can get so bad that it can cause the root of a tooth to rot and fall out.

Here are a few simple things that can get your pup’s dental health on the right track:
Get your puppy used to daily dental care. Yes, it may be difficult to train your pup to become used to dental cleanings, but this is just as important as choosing a proper diet. Begin brushing your dog’s teeth between the ages of eight and sixteen weeks. The more often you do it, the easier it will get as your puppy becomes an adult.

Pay close attention to your pup’s teething behavior. This will not be difficult because you will definitely notice your pup chewing on anything that they can get his paws (and jaws) on! Raw meaty bones or elk antler chews are a great outlet for puppies going through the teething stage. Not only are they a tasty chew treat, but they also help clean their teeth and massage their aching gums. Just remember to supervise your pet when they are enjoying bones or other chews.

A proper and completely balanced diet is important to keep your growing puppy healthy and to develop strong teeth and bones. Dogs rely solely on bones as a major part of their diet because it not only provides proper nutrition, but it also assists in dental cleaning. Yes, dental cleaning! The BARF Diet includes ground bone that helps scrape off the plaque from your pet’s teeth during meals.

Many dental diseases can be avoided when feeding the BARF Diet. Not only is it a completely balanced diet, providing your growing puppy the nutrition necessary for healthy growth and development, but it also helps to keep your puppy’s teeth clean. BARF doesn’t contain artificial ingredients that stick to your pet’s teeth and cause plaque and tartar, and the ground bone in our formulas helps to scrape any buildup on your pet’s teeth for a more pleasant breath and cleaner, whiter teeth.

bwantlerchewWe have also recently added some great Elk Antler Chews to our product line (available at www.barfworld.com) because we know that chewing is second-nature for dogs. These all-natural antler chews will soothe your pups gums and provide proper nutrition at the same time. They are naturally shed and sun-dried with no preservatives or other junk added. Since a puppy’s new teeth are weaker than adolescent dogs, some raw bones can damage their teeth. This is why we recommend the split antler chew, which is cut in half, exposing the marrow, and allows for a softer, safer chew for your pup. Split antler chews will keep your pup busy for hours without damaging their teeth!

For those dealing with destructive chewers: BARF World recently teamed up with a wonderful dog trainer, named Doggy Dan, who has great tips for puppy owners that have destructive chewers at home. If you’d like to find out more about how to deal with problem behaviors like destructive chewing, barking, nipping, jumping up, or potty training, please visit www.barfworld.com/DoggyDan.

References:

http://animal.discovery.com/pets/healthy-pets/5-dental-care-tips.htm

2013-06-27_1338http://www.milfordanimalhospital.com/articles/canine/dental.htm ggggMonica Reyes is a Raw Pet Food Specialist for BARF World Inc. She is a full-time student and working mom to a young toddler, a terrier mix named Mookie and a tabby cat named Phillip. Monica enjoys healthy home cooking and spending quality time with her family. For more articles like these and to learn more about the benefits of raw food for your pets, sign up for The Intelligent Pet monthly e-zine at www.barfworld.com.

 
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Dental Health Tips for Senior Dogs

By Robert Mueller

bwdogIt has been reported that dogs that get routine dental care live an average of two years longer than those that don’t. In a previous blog post, I reported earlier about the connection between oral health and heart disease in dogs. Health issues can worsen to the point of impacting the dog’s major organ systems, including the heart.

The explanation centers around the formation of bacterial infection from dogs that exhibit poor oral health. Plaque is a biofilm composed mainly of bacteria, and it attacks the tissue just under the gum line. The result is inflamed and infected gum tissue. Calculus (tartar) formation develops and causes bone loss, leading to gum recession – and now we have full-blown periodontal disease.

It is at this stage that the infection can spread throughout the body. Because it is located below the gum line, bacteria can easily transfer through the bloodstream to the internal body organs. Periodic dental exams are critical prevention stages for isolating periodontal disease before the senior life stage of your pet. Many years of plaque and tartar buildup will eventually result in diseased oral health and internal organ damage.

We also know that as a dog gets older, she will have diminished immune function and therefore will be less capable of fighting off the effects of the bacteria.

There are several very simple tests that can be done by the pet owner to really prevent and uncover the early development of the disease:

The most obvious sign of possible dental problems is bad breath. Bad breath indicates that harmful bacteria are present and accumulating in the mouth.
A simple upper lip lift will tell you quickly what is going on with the upper teeth. The upper teeth are likely to be the first teeth to be severely affected with periodontal disease.
A visual check to see if your dog has an obvious problem when eating, or favoring the food on one side of the mouth or the other.
A natural slowdown in activity may be a telltale sign of hidden pain.
If it is not possible to inspect the upper teeth, then it must be pointed out to the vet to make this check when conducting other examinations. Since two-thirds of the tooth is below the gum line, it is prudent to ask for dental x-rays when you see signs of tartar and plaque buildup on the upper third.
Since we have many small breed dogs as customers, I find it important to point out that small breed dogs are more likely to be affected with periodontal problems than large breed dogs. Selective breeding (which produces smaller dogs) reduces the amount of bone around the teeth; therefore, the same amount of inflammation will have a proportionately more serious effect in toy breeds than for larger dogs.

Dental fractures also become more common because the jaw may not have enough strength to resist impact. It is important to pay attention to the dental condition of toy and small breed pets early on and to understand the value of disease prevention.

I have observed the eating habits of dogs and cats for the last 37 years and I have concluded that artificial diets (dry kibble) are the most prominent reason for poor dental health. I compare the cause of the formation of dental plaque to that of humans eating popcorn daily. Imagine the dental plaque formation that would result from packing popcorn shells between our teeth and then not brushing or flossing afterwards. The dental problems that would result would be similar to the dental problems of our pets.

By feeding your pooch a fresh, frozen raw food diet for dogs, you will find that plaque and tartar buildup is significantly reduced. The dog will gulp and slightly chew the meat before swallowing it, therefore reducing the possibility of packing food items between the teeth. The natural teeth-cleaning action from eating raw meaty bones is why we call bones “Nature’s toothbrush”. No need to put your dog through expensive anesthesia procedures to brush their teeth – Nature does it for you!

The fact that dental health is improved from feeding your dog or cat naturally healthy dog food (BARF World’s BARF Diet), and raw meaty bones is another reason why we see an extension of life from dogs. You’ll combine the advantages of proper nutrition, better utilization of ingredients, and the improvement of immune system health, and your pet’s dental problems will become insignificant in comparison to those dogs fed dry processed pet food.

rob muellerRobert Mueller, BSc, Pharm. is a registered pharmacist, author of “Living Enzymes: The World’s Best Kept Pet Food Secret”, and co-developer of BARF World’s BARF diets patties, nuggets and supplements – the first company to make the Biologically Appropriate Raw Foods (BARF) diet conveniently available to animals everywhere. He and his wife love to travel around the world with their dog, Moxie – a Yorkshire Terrier/Maltese mix. For more articles like these and to learn more about the benefits of raw food for your pets, sign up for “The Intelligent Pet” monthly e-zine at The Intelligent Pet.

BARF WORLD DISCLAIMER: The information provided is for general educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your veterinarian. BARF World’s raw pet food specialists cannot answer specific questions about your pet’s medical issues or make medical recommendations for your pet – instead, please refer to your own veterinarian. BARF World and its agents assume no responsibility for any consequence relating directly or indirectly to any action or inaction you take based on the information, services, or other material on the website. While BARF World strives to keep the information provided on the website accurate, complete, and up-to-date, BARF World cannot guarantee and will not be responsible for any damage or loss related to the accuracy, completeness, or timeliness of the information on the website. Offers are subject to change or cancellation at any time and BARF World is not responsible for pricing or other errors.

 
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The Pros and Cons of Dental Cleaning

2013-10-16_1527By Dr. Cathy Alinovi

Imagine for a moment you never went to the dentist…or brushed your teeth…for 5 years! No matter how good your diet, there’s going to be plaque and tartar.

What makes plaque form? Bacteria – in our mouths. So, we humans get our teeth cleaned every 6 months.

Now let’s consider our canine friends: how many of us really brush our dogs’ teeth? I mean to, but shoot, I have 8 dogs. Some days it’s tough to even get my own teeth done before I fall into bed. So, even on the best diet, our dogs’ mouths have bacteria. Which leads to tartar, which leads to decay, and eventually bacteria in the blood.

Guess where that bacteria likes to go? To the heart, liver, kidneys and anywhere else with small blood vessels. Many heart murmurs are valve problems – caused by bacteria, probably from the mouth.

So, what are our options? If you start with nice shiny teeth (puppyhood), dog parents can brush teeth everyday, and give raw meaty bones and antlers to chew on. If we aren’t starting with nice shiny teeth, really, a dental cleaning is the best option.

There are two common ways to give dogs dental cleanings: with anesthesia or without. Sedation-free dental cleanings save all the risk of anesthesia. That’s the biggest plus. Downside is it’s nearly impossible to get a dog to hold its mouth open to clean the inside of the teeth. And it might really hurt to pull a rotten tooth while awake. What’s cool is in dogs, unlike humans, most of the plaque/tartar is on the outside of the teeth, but not all. So sedation-free dentistry can do good things.

Dental cleanings with anesthesia means no pain and a very thorough cleaning inside and out. And it makes it possible to pull some really tough teeth, especially if they are so rotten that they need to come out. However, it also means there is anesthesia risk.

There’s no one right answer, but I know I don’t want my pups having bacteria in their blood and I don’t want them having pain from loose teeth. Ideally: brush, feed a raw diet, give antlers to chew, but know that some dogs genetically have a risk of bad teeth (little ones) and take care of it early when tartar builds up on your pup’s teeth.

2013-07-17_1617Dr. Cathy Alinovi is the owner of Hoofstock Veterinary Service and Hoopeston Veterinary Service in Indiana. Certified in Veterinary Food Therapy, Veterinary Acupuncture, Chinese Herbal Therapy, and Aromatherapy, Dr. Cathy’s approach provides whole body support through both the best in veterinary medicine as well as high-quality, all-natural foods, supplements, and health care products. She offers phone consultation services as well as in-office appointments. Visit www.hoofstockvet.com for more information.

BARF WORLD DISCLAIMER: The information provided is for general educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your veterinarian. BARF World’s raw pet food specialists cannot answer specific questions about your pet’s medical issues or make medical recommendations for your pet – instead, please refer to your own veterinarian. BARF World and its agents assume no responsibility for any consequence relating directly or indirectly to any action or inaction you take based on the information, services, or other material on the website. While BARF World strives to keep the information provided on the website accurate, complete, and up-to-date, BARF World cannot guarantee and will not be responsible for any damage or loss related to the accuracy, completeness, or timeliness of the information on the website. Offers are subject to change or cancellation at any time and BARF World is not responsible for pricing or other errors.

 
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