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Enzyme Therapy For Dogs

Published on May 23, 2008 by in BARF, enzymes, Health

Studying enzyme nutrition has been a passion for me. It has led me to writing a book on the subject and studying the dramatic benefits of proper enzyme supplementation. If enzyme research establishes one thing for sure, it’s that enzyme therapy can reduce inflammation. Inflammation is an immune system response, that leads to a long list of chronic diseases in both humans and animals. It can even lead to heart disease.  When inflammation rages unchecked in the joints or arteries, it can permanently destroy tissue and cause terrible pain. It can even lead to death. Enzyme therapy can bring significant relief and in many cases can be more effective than anti-inflammatory medications and without the dangerous side effects.

There is a difference between good and bad inflammation. In general, inflammation is how the body kills the invaders. The problem is that inflammation is supposed to solve the problem and then go away. When it is associated with diseases like allergies and arthritis, the inflammation is chronic and usually harmful. The immune system attacks and destroys the animals own tissues. The immune system forms antibodies to destroy antigens which are viruses, a fungus, or a bacteria. If the antigen is in fact something harmless such as pollen, dust, wheat or milk, they are termed allergens. There is no reason for the immune system to attack allergens but it does anyway. Like wise the animals body can misidentify its own tissues as antigens and form auto-antibodies. The result is autoimmune disease. This response seems to figure in some unexpected disorders such as heart disease and even cancer.

Enzymes may not be a cure for autoimmune diseases all by themselves, but they can bring tremendous relief and can help the animal live with the condition. Managing and controlling inflammation goes a long way toward limiting the harm that autoimmune conditions can cause.

posted by Rob Mueller

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5 Comments  comments 

5 Responses

  1. Robin

    I have three puppies; my toy poodle is eating dog poop in the yard! What is that all about, and what can I do to stop it? I thought it might have something to do with a lack of enzymes, and I thought it would stop when she started eating the BARF food – they’ve all been on it for over a month. HELP

    Robin

    • chris

      this is the classic symptom of malabsorption. the way i understand it is the dog can’t digest it’s food and re-eats it in a second attempt. make sense?

      does your dog eat a lot and still not gain weight? skin problems?

      i believe dogs need individualized diets. there is no one diet for all dogs. some dogs do very well on raw. some don’t! i would avoid commercial food altogether. i’ve read a few books on the pet food industry and it’s repulsive for the most part. there are no guarantees because most companies don’t police the co-packers where they get their raw materials.

      so read about cooking for your dog. then you may have to figure out what he/she does well on and what to avoid. anne martin’s “foods pets die for”.

  2. Hi Robb – really enjoyed your seminar at Fetching Frieda’s Doggie Day Spa. Can you tell me where to find the ebook – I have the coupon but don’t know where to find it.

    Sheila

  3. I have been looking into feeding my animals (rat terrier & beagle) an enzyme supplement. However, I haven’t been able to find much research out there concerning the amount of enzymes that actually are in a dry dog food. I have learned that all foods naturally contain enzymes before they are heat treated but I want to know if any of the enzymes make it into a packaged dog food. I have also noticed that dog foods almost never have enzymes guaranteed on the labels which leads me to believe they are so minute in the food they aren’t worth listing. Also can a dog get too much enzyme supplement?

    Thanks,
    Teresa

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