Processed Food For Pets

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An Inconsistency In The Practice of Veterinary Medicine (at least in the United States)

Vet’s with a special interest in a particular field require more education and training.

By Dr. Cathy Alinovi DVM

When most people go to the veterinarian it is assumed the veterinarian is trained in the skills that are needed. Graduation from a veterinary curriculum means “trained and ready to serve your pets.”

Any veterinarian can provide any service. There are specialty services that may require additional training – like orthopedic surgery or spinal manipulation – but none of these services require that the veterinarian be board certified.

Some veterinarians find they have a special interest in a particular field and want more depth to their training. Be it dermatology, behavior, or herbal medicine, these doctors return to school, perform research, and publish their results before “sitting for the board” exam. Once the board examination is passed, that veterinarian is a specialist in that area, but can still practice all other areas of medicine if he or she chooses. An internal medicine veterinarian can still perform surgery, as an example.

On the other side of the coin, a general practice veterinarian can provide any service as already mentioned, like surgery or internal medicine. The purpose of board certification is two-fold: provide the doctor more training in a specialty field, and increase the body of knowledge in that field – both of which benefits more pets.

Some pet owners may need the services of the board-certified veterinarian to resolve their pet’s health issue. Some general practitioners may consult with a specialist on a case.

At no point is the generalist precluded from practicing in the specialty field – except in the field of veterinary nutrition. For some reason, the American College of Veterinary Nutrition is different.

Some vet’s have little to no training in nutrition.

While every veterinarian in this country is considered capable of practicing all aspects of veterinary medicine upon graduation and passage of the national veterinary board exam, general practice veterinarians are strongly discouraged from giving nutrition advice to their clients.

It would be possible to argue it’s because veterinarians receive little to no training in nutrition in school, but the same can be said for orthopedic surgery. (Either field would be an elective for further training.) Therefore, lack of training isn’t the explanation why general practice veterinarians are discouraged from giving nutritional advice.

Is it about control? Is it that the ACVN wants to change the entire veterinary health care system in this country and model it after human medicine where only specialists can practice? Can pet owners afford such a paradigm? Is this an unfair practice behavior opening the ACVN and veterinary medicine to libel?

If the veterinary nutrition industry were open to growth like every other specialty area, the ACVN would offer courses in continuing education for the general practitioner. They do not offer this at this time. The ACVN is a closed association- I then begin to wonder what, or who, is behind this?

Dr. Cathy Alinovi is from Indiana and now retired from her practice. Certified in Veterinary Food Therapy, Veterinary Acupuncture, Chinese Herbal Therapy, and Aromatherapy, Dr. Cathy’s approach is committed to the health of our pets and continues to educate pet parents with her writing, books and research in pet health. Learn more at drcathyvet.com

 
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THANK GOODNESS FOR YOU THINKERS!

By Robert Mueller

Some annually required vaccinations can be avoided with
a simple test to see if the previous dose is still present.

Today’s topic is something WE ALL need think about.  Please don’t accept what I recommend or what your vet (or your doctor) tells you to do without undertaking some additional investigation on your own.  Whether or not to vaccinate is a topic that pertains not only to our pets but to our children as well.  The big question is whether or not it is the right thing to do.

I have spent almost 40 years teaching people that feeding a raw food diet is a more appropriate way to feed a dog or cat than feeding it heat processed, kibble dry food. Although it’s been tough trying to “teach an old dog new tricks”, I’m happy to report that in the last several years the popularity of raw feeding for pets has skyrocketed…and we have a healthier pet population to prove it.

Thank goodness there are people like you who now realize that raw feeding is an effective and safe alternative to the chemically laden, genetically modified, heat processed diets that are sold everywhere today.  Thank goodness people like you have become knowledgeable about how to read a label (and you actually read them before you buy). Thank goodness YOU know that over time, feeding a kibble or canned diet can result in potential medical conditions caused by dehydration, residual toxin accumulation and chemical residues.  Thank goodness you THINK about all these things.

The scary thing is that most people don’t THINK anymore. They just believe what they hear on the news or whatever the vet or doctor tells them…and then they follow blindly along.  This brings me to the subject of vaccination…and whether or not it’s the right thing to do.

Vaccination is definitely a controversial topic and it’s a question that we get asked all the time here at BARF World. Like anything else that carries two sides to the story, there is a good side and a bad side. You must consider the advantages and weigh them against the disadvantages. I do this by asking myself the question: what affect will vaccinating have on my dog or cats immune system? Do the benefits outweigh the potential harm?  (By the way, I always recommend this same line of reasoning to customers when they first consider feeding raw vs. kibble or heat processed diets.)

The use of the canine vaccine against Lyme disease is a good example, which illustrates this point.  It is believed now that if your dog has already been exposed to the Lyme organism, there is no known benefit of vaccinating further against the disease.   Tick control for all dogs in tick-infested areas is more important than vaccination.  Tick collars and topical products are safer and more effective deterrents.

But My Vet Recommended It.  Like many other drugs, over-vaccinating can cause more harm than good. Most vets agree that some vaccines are effective and have saved millions of pet’s lives. A vaccine works by introducing the potential virus and then triggering an immune response that prepares your pet to fight future infections.  But here’s what you may not know.  Once your puppy or kitten is fully immunized against future viruses, he is immune for years, and often for life.

What this means is that after your pet has received all his puppy shots, the antibodies he develops to the viruses he’s been immunized against will actually protect him from the same viruses introduced in future vaccinations. Therefore future vaccinations against the same virus are virtually useless!

Dr. Karen Becker DVM in Illinois claims that vaccines, like any pharmaceutical drug, are not without side effects. So re-vaccinating for the same pathogens year after year is more than a waste of money-it also poses ever- increasing risks to your pet’s health.

But there’s a darker side too.  Dr. Becker feels that the vaccination business is a major profit center for many veterinarians who depend on vaccination schedules to keep the doors open.  An eye-opening example is the markup on the rabies vaccine. She indicates that it can escalate from 2400 to 6200 percent profit in many cases. Estimates indicate, that removing the one-year rabies vaccination/office visit for dogs alone could reduce a veterinarian’s income from $87,000 to $25,000. And this example involves just one variety of one vaccine, and only for dogs.

Just as you did when deciding to switch to a raw diet for your pet, please take time and do your own research on this important subject.   Become well informed and consider the risk to benefit ratio before you make that vet appointment to have your pet vaccinated. It’s a hot topic…and one that requires THINKING!  Thank goodness you are not one of the blind followers. 

ggggRobert Mueller, BSc, Pharm. is a registered pharmacist, author of Living Enzymes: The World’s Best Kept Pet Food Secret”, and co-developer of BARF World’s BARF Diets® patties, nuggets and supplements – the first company to make the Biologically Appropriate Raw Foods (BARF®) diet conveniently available to animals everywhere.  To receive more articles like these in your email inbox,click here to sign up for “The Intelligent Pet” weekly e-zine absolutely FREE!

 
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Proper Handling of Raw Meat – A Quick Safety Reminder

By: Robert Mueller,

Just like food for yourself, our pet’s food should
be exposed to room temperature for as little
time as possible.

One issue that manufacturers of kibble and canned pet foods often raise in an attempt to discredit raw meat diets, is the safety factor of handling raw meat and feeding it to our pet population.

As a manufacturer of raw pet food, we follow strict protocol and guidelines to maintain the quality and integrity of our raw meat diets during production.  However, it is also important for the consumer to practice safe handling procedures for raw meat for both their family and pets. Paying attention to the details of handling meat will ultimately render a safe, superior quality product. This is no different than how you would handle raw meat in the kitchen for a human meal.

    • Always wash your hands and kitchen surfaces to avoid the spread of bacteria.  Remember to clean cutting boards, counter tops and utensils with hot soapy water after feeding or preparing raw food.
    • Never thaw the BARF Patties at room temperature such as on the counter top in your kitchen.  Always thaw the BARF patties in the refrigerator in a covered container.
    • Choose the right portion for your dog. Keep in mind, when selecting how much food to thaw that it is ideal to only thaw a day’s worth of food from the freezer at a time. Smaller dogs may not be able to eat a whole patty in a day. For this we recommend our Nuggets Recipe- perfect for small mouths and tummies.
    • At Barf World, we regularly remind consumers not to leave raw meat diets unrefrigerated for long periods of time.  If the Barf Diet is not going to be consumed by your pet right away, it should be returned to the refrigerator and stored in a container with a lid so that it can be fed later in the day.  Food left out in the feeding dish for long periods of time, especially during the hot summer months or in warmer temperature climates, can result in spoiled food and bacteria growth.

At the end of the day, you should dispose of any uneaten food. This helps to keep food at its peak freshness. This is the safest way to avoid any digestive upset and offer the highest nutritious value for your pet’s meal. 

Remember this is a raw meat diet (living food) and not kibble!   The food that will boost your pet’s immune system, keep unnecessary weight off, and prevent diet-related disease is not one that has been designed to sit on a shelf at room temperatures for months. The active enzymes in a BARF Diet are the key to maximizing the time we get to spend with our four-legged friends.

For more information about safe handling procedures for raw dog diets, visit our website at www.barfworld.com.

ggggRobert Mueller, BSc, Pharm. is a registered pharmacist, author of Living Enzymes: The World’s Best Kept Pet Food Secret”, and co-developer of BARF World’s BARF Diets® patties, nuggets and supplements – the first company to make the Biologically Appropriate Raw Foods (BARF®) diet conveniently available to animals everywhere.  To receive more articles like these in your email inbox,click here to sign up for “The Intelligent Pet” weekly e-zine absolutely FREE!

 
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